Guidelines for Canadian drinking water quality, 1978
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Published by Health and Welfare Canada in [Ottawa] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Drinking water -- Standards -- Canada.,
  • Water quality -- Canada.

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsCanada. Health and Welfare Canada., Federal-Provincial Working Group on Drinking Water (Canada).
Classifications
LC ClassificationsTD226.A1 F44 1980
The Physical Object
Pagination[50], 739 p. ;
Number of Pages739
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21010667M
ISBN 100662109333

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96 rows  Science-based guideline technical documents and guidance documents are published to . Guidelines for Canadian drinking water quality, [Ottawa]: Minister of National Health and Welfare ; Hull, Quebec: available from Canadian Government Pub. Centre, (OCoLC) Online version: Federal-Provincial Working Group on Drinking Water (Canada). Guidelines for Canadian drinking water quality, Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality—Summary Table 5 New, revised, reaffirmed and upcoming guidelines Guidelines for several chemical, physical and microbiological parameters are new or have been revised since the publication of the Sixth Edition of the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality in Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality: Guideline Technical Document 1 February, 1,2-Dichloroethane Part I. Overview and Application Guideline A maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of mg/L (5 µg/L) is established for 1,2-dichloroethane in drinking water. .

A new Health Canada guideline for Canadian drinking water quality. In March , Health Canada announced a new Guideline for drinking water quality in Canada. Under the new Guideline, the maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for lead in drinking water will be reduced from 10 μg/L (micrograms per Litre) to 5 μg/L. revision of drinking-water quality regulations and standards using the WHO Guidelines for drinking-water quality (GDWQ) (WHO, a). This guidance should always be read and used in conjunction with the GDWQ. The GDWQ present a framework for ensuring the safety of drinking-water. GUIDELINES FOR DRINKING-WATER QUALITY Packaged drinking-water Food production and processing 7. Microbial aspects Microbial hazards associated with drinking-water Waterborne infections Emerging issues Persistence and growth in water Public health aspects Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality: Guideline Technical Document 3 Most Canadian drinking water supplies maintain free chlorine residuals in the – mg/L range in the distribution system. At these concentrations, taste and odour related to chlorine or its by-products are generally within the range of acceptability for most.

The Guidelines for drinking-water quality (GDWQ) promote the protection of public health by advocating for the development of locally relevant standards and regulations (health based targets), adoption of preventive risk management approaches covering catchment to consumer (Water Safety Plans) and independent surveillance to ensure that Water. 2. The Guidelines: a framework for safe drinking-water 22 Framework for safe drinking-water: requirements 22 Health-based targets 24 System assessment and design 25 Operational monitoring 26 Management plans, documentation and communication 27 Surveillance of drinking-water quality Richmond, British Columbia # – Viking Way Richmond, BC, V6V 2K9, Canada Phone: () Fax: () Email: [email protected] Monday to Friday 8 . The development of Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality is described. These guidelines are compared with guidelines published by the World Health Organization in Information is included on drinking water quality in Canada and drinking water consumption habits of Canadians.